What hotel management students can learn from Chef Aditya Fatepuria

Besides generating millions in revenue, Sattvam also earned the trust of thousands of repeat customers, including celebrities.

Chef Aditya Fatepuria doesn’t just love food, he worships it. Every dish he creates is treated like a deity, adorned with vibrant colours, rich aroma, and farm-fresh flavours.

Aditya fatepuria
Aditya Fatepuria, Co-founder, Sattvam

Fatepuria’s Bangalore-based fine-dining restaurant Sattvam draws a high-spending vegetarian crowd— particularly those craving a Sattvic cuisine. Barely a decade old, the restaurant has opened three branches in the city.

Besides generating millions in revenue, Sattvam also earned the trust of thousands of repeat customers, including celebrities. The brand is now planning to expand overseas.

Fatepuria owes his success not just to his business sense or passion for cooking. His purpose goes beyond that: To feed his guests to their heart’s content without compromising on the quality of ingredients. He is a strong believer of Atithi Devo Bhava (Guest is God)— a life lesson he learnt during his stint at ISKCON Bangalore.

“Even when there is a rise in price of certain ingredients, our price on the menu remains the same. Our guest doesn’t have to bear the brunt of the unforeseen price inflation,” he says. This thoughtful attitude is one of the many reasons why tables are never empty at Sattvam.

Despite being a standalone restaurant, the success rate has been quite high for Sattvam— on par with restaurants nestled in star hotels. The standalone restaurant has done financially well even during the pandemic.

Fatepuria, an alumni of Institute of Hotel Management-Bengaluru, says that students, who aspire to become chefpreneurs, should look at working in standalone restaurants.

“I agree that there are advantages to working in reputed star properties. I worked with ITC Sheraton after I graduated. However, if you are passionate and true to your work, opportunities are plenty in standalone restaurants too. There is more learning. There is more money. Considering the business that a standalone restaurant like Sattvam is doing, students not only gain extensive operational knowledge, but they also gain confidence to start something on their own. There is life beyond being a management trainee in a star hotel, and one should explore it,” says Fatepuria.

Aditya fatepuria
Every dish at Sattvam is treated like a deity, adorned with vibrant colours, rich aroma, and farm-fresh flavours.

Although the restaurant is called Sattvam, Fatepuria says that his menu isn’t branded as Sattvik.

“I call it neoclassical,” he says, adding that the concept of Saatvik has been misrepresented.

“Sattvic has varied definitions, varied perspectives. Other than the definition you might find in books, I’ve learnt from various temple trusts, including ISKCON Bangalore where I worked for five years, that Sattvik food is fresh, pure, wholesome, and fatty. Sattvik meals are cooked with love and devotion,” he says.

By not using onion, garlic, caffeine, and mushroom, Sattvam has successfully captured the market share of brahmin foodies who want to indulge, but in a traditional format.

Read more:

Glass Kitchen & Bar: Made for the climate-conscious millennial

It’s a treat for gourmands as Glasshouse launches in Gurugram

Las Vegas Food & Beverage Industry Week to be held in March